Podcasts

We publish a new feminist podcast episode every week. Our hour-long show Popaganda digs deep on movies, books, TV, and media while Backtalk is a snappy conversation between two Bitch editors about the week’s pop culture. Subscribe to the podcasts on iTunes!
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Popaganda: Fembots

From Metropolis to Westworld, female robots have always played out complicated power dynamics onscreen.

Backtalk: Believe Women & Just Say No to Normalizing Nazis

This week in schadenfreude: Project Veritas.

Backtalk: Louis C.K. & Election 2017

The truth behind “rumors” & finally some good news. 

Popaganda: Queering Family Values

“Family values” has been co-opted by right-wing folks. But what the hell! Feminists have strong values, and we have strong families, too.

Popaganda: Designing for Democracy

Political observers often blame people for not voting. But we don’t often stop to examine what barriers keep people from voting—or make them feel like it’s not worthwhile.

Backtalk: Indictment Day & Kevin Spacey

This week, Dahlia and Amy dig into the beginning of the indictments against Trump-adjacent folks and the latest crop of sexual abuse allegations against powerful men. There’s have a moment of mini-celebrations because FBI director’s Robert Mueller’s investigation into Trump’s campaign team and possible collusion with Russian officials. Indictments were served for former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort and his business partner Rick Gates. Trump’s former advisor, George Papadopoulos, plead guilty to lying to the FBI! Yowza. Prayer hand emojis for more days of indictment to come. Then they discuss the latest in Hollywood fuckery with actor Anthony Rapp’s story of a 26-year-old Kevin Spacey making sexual advances against Rapp when he was just 14 years old. Spacey tried to divert from attention to this by coming out as a gay man. Ugh. 

Popaganda: Fear

The only thing we have to fear is fear itself? Give me a break. What about being afraid of murder? Indefinite detention? Stand-up comedy? On this episode, we explore some of the many things that make us afraid. The show begins with a story from filmmaker Assia Boundaoui, who grew up in a mostly Arab American neighborhood that was under FBI surveillance. Then, we have two perspectives on feminism and horror films: Writer Leela Ginelle discusses how films like Funny Games and Panic Room tie into real-life fears of domestic violence and film buff Sara Century looks at the history of queer women in horror (bring on the lesbian vampires!). We end the show with comedian Jenny Yang, who explains how the only way to get beyond your fear of getting onstage is to actually get onstage.   

Backtalk: Weinstein, #MeToo, Everything is Terrible

This week, Dahlia and Amy talk-yell about all of the sexual harassment and assault allegations against Hollywood producer, Harvey Weinstein, and its impact on the industry and beyond. Following breaking stories from the New York Times and the New Yorker, more than 40 women have come forward with their own stories of abuse from Weinstein. This case against Weinstein can introduce a sea change in both the film industry and beyond, but this episode also discusses the limits of survivors sharing their trauma for empathy, like in the case with #MeToo tag. Women have faced sexual assault and harassment since approximately forever, will exposing ourselves with #MeToo create impactful cultural change? They also dig into Mayim Bialik’s victim-blamey NYT op-ed where she posits that maybe ladies wouldn’t be so easily harassed if they’d only just dress more modestly (she’s since apologized for her misguided essay).

Popaganda: Growing Up Immigrant

When politicians and pundits talk about immigrants, they far too often use language that makes it seem like immigrants are… other. Not real Americans. Not able to be trusted. Their histories, experiences, and native languages, those should be pushed aside in favor of the “melting pot” of English. At the same time, stories of immigrant families are noticably absent from our pop culture. While millions of North Americans are growing up as children of immigrants, you can count the number of third-culture kids on TV on one hand. Today’s episode shares the personal stories of people growing up as first-generation Americans and Canadians. The people we interview discuss navigating their parents’ traditions with their own personal politics and learning to value where they come from—despite all the cultural forces that erase immigrant stories. This episode features linguist and psychologist Julie Sedivy, poet Fatimah Asghar, filmmaker Anne Galisky, journalist Belinda Cai, and podcaster TK Matunda.  

Backtalk: Lone Wolf Myth & Kneeling for Justice

This week, Dahlia and Amy talk about how mainstream media upholds white supremacy by continually casting white, male, mass murderers as “lone wolves.” This week marked the deadliest mass shooting in recent US history, where Stephen Paddock gunned down 58 people and injured 500 more, yet there have been headlines humanizing him and how “enjoyed gambling, country music; lived quiet life before massacre.” Let’s not kid ourselves, the story about the killer would be much different if he wasn’t white. Then they discuss the latest in pro-athletes protests as the NFL season gets underway, and how no one respects Trump the “bum.” Speaking of him, in the Mr. Toad Trump’s Wild Ride segment, they dig into his purposeful and racist inaction in the face of a natural disaster in Puerto Rico.

Popaganda: Why We Love Sports

Being a feminist sports fan is complicated. Athletes are talented artists and teams can build community and confidence. But sports culture has many dark sides: violence, homophobia, greed. On this episode, we talk with feminist fans of football, tennis, soccer, and basketball about what keeps them watching and how they’re working to change sports for the better. The great Jessica Luther joins us to discuss how she remains a football fan while working on a book about sexual assault in college football programs. Steph Yang talks about how women’s soccer has become a positive place for LGBTQ players and fans, despite the rampant homophobia seen in other sports. Amy Lam expounds on NBA players taking stands for social justice issues—while owners who would prefer they remain silent. Veronica Arreola encourages us all to attend at least one women’s sporting event this year. Plus: Applause for Serena Williams, superstition about the Cubs, and a tale of a high school football player who became a cheerleader. 

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