Latest Articles

No Good Deeds: “Succession” Rejects the Redemption Arc for Its Ruthless Characters

HBO’s hourlong drama about a Murdoch-inspired family slyly toys with Americans’ impulse to see the good in the worst people, particularly when those people are white. 

On Our Radar—Feminist News Roundup: What Happens When a Medical GoFundMe Doesn't Go Viral

“You should not have to ask for largesse from the Internet not to drown.”

Backtalk: So Burning Books is Back?

This week, Dahlia and Amy get into the recent campus conflict when white students with hurt feelings thought it’d be a good idea to burn books written by a visiting author.

Very Online: Gina Rodriguez, Black People Deserve More Than a Notes App Apology

When celebrities want to apologize, their fans deserve more than a half-hearted screenshot from their Notes app.

Housebound: Why the Dollhouse Metaphor Remains So Indelible

The dollhouses of today are not, then, miniature playgrounds that train girls to believe their future paths go no further than their front door.

On Our Radar—Feminist News Roundup: California’s Deliberate Blackouts Are the New Normal

California’s blackouts were dangerous—and they’re going to happen again.

How @EmoBlackThot Infiltrated Black Women’s Safe Spaces

At times, she seemed too good to be true. And now we know she was: @EmoBlackThot was not our dark-skinned digital big sister; in fact, she wasn’t a sister at all.

Me Who?: Debbie Harry’s “Face It” and the Challenge of Addressing Outmoded Rape Narratives

The urge to superimpose the cultural context of today on the difficult truths of the past risks erasing them.

On Our Radar—Feminist News Roundup: Why You Never See Your Friends Anymore

“The hours in which we work, rest, and socialize are becoming ever more desynchronized.”

Leah Vernon Won’t Be Hemmed in by the Fashion Industry

The fat, Black, Muslim, blogger speaks truth to power on her Instagram account, in her new book, and in this raw, honest interview.

Uneasy Spirits: Black Vengeance in Supernatural Pop Culture

There’s a specter in our midst, and it’s white people’s projection of their own guilt and fear onto the Black search for justice.

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