Books

Ancestral Roots: Bernice L. McFadden Sings An Enslaved Black Woman’s Song

After the darkness, there’s light. Read more »

Brutal Entertainment: “Sadie” Turns True Crime Upside Down

Not many people get to build a platform on writing the most brittle girls imaginable. Read more »

Unapologetically Free: Charlene Carruthers Gives Us A Black, Queer, and Feminist Mandate for Radical Movements

If we see our work through a Black Queer Feminist Lens, we can actually move toward and be engaged in that work of collective liberation. Read more »

Naming Fears: Vivek Shraya on Vulnerability as a Tool for Transformation

What if saying “I’m afraid” was just as much of a statement of resilience as “I’m not afraid?” Read more »

Smashing Barriers: Mara Altman and Virgie Tovar On Body Acceptance, Fatphobia, and Imagining a New World for Women

Diet culture is just the newest form of women’s subjugation. Read more »

2018 Was the Summer of the Asian Beach Read

Having access to the “beach read” label feels like acceptance—the ability to reach audiences who might see our work as a source of pleasure instead of education. Read more »

Girl on a Sexist Bandwagon: The Consequences of Publishing’s “Gone Girl” Craze

In these books, certain women are allowed to be messy, make mistakes, and commit heinous crimes while also being presented as anti-heroines who are simply ensnared in systems larger than themselves. Read more »

Moving Past Toxicity: Fighting for a New Vision of Masculinity

What is the masculinity that exists beyond patriarchy? Read more »

Curses and Kitchens: “Jell-O Girls” Looks at the Secret, Sexist History of America’s Classic Dessert

“Jell-O Girls” is at once a memoir, a family history, and an overview of the domestication (and dissolution) of the American kitchen. Read more »

Pages

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »

Know & Tell: The literary renaissance of trans women writers

For so long, the people who wrote about us were not us. Finally, that is beginning to change. Read more »

Demanding the Impossible: Walidah Imarisha Talks About Science Fiction and Social Change

Before she was a poet, journalist, documentary filmmaker, anti-prison activist, and college instructor, Walidah Imarisha was fascinated... Read more »

A Look at How Media Writes Women of Color

Nearly every Saturday morning, feminists of color hold Twitter discussions taking a deeper look at issues, such as gender violence. It’s the... Read more »