Books

Dark of the Matin

Despite the obvious social critiques in the books, I never consciously drew parallels between the wizarding world and my world. I wanted Harry Potter to exist in a vacuum. But as the books went on, the back stories grew more complex, the danger became more insidious and intimidating, and the... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Retrosexism in Life on Mars and LA Noire

From the village bobby on his bicycle to elaborate games of cops and robbers in mid-20th century America, detective fiction often harks back to the past. From a feminist perspective, this is a can of worms. Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Let's Celebrate the Spinster Detective

Presenting an unthreatening facade to the world, older women detectives usually conceal razor-sharp investigative skills and intelligence. Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple is one of the classic examples of these subversive characters. Read more »

Bibliobitch: Zazen

In a nameless yet all-too-familiar city, where “box-mall-churches” and faceless plazas named after the banks that funded them rub up against vegan cafes, yoga studios, and a “mural of neighborhood black people enjoying gentrification,” Della Mylinak thinks about what it would be like to set... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: About the US Killing

So, hopefully I’ve sold you on Sarah Lund and the Danish TV series Forbrydelsen now. But what about that US remake, The Killing? Read more »

Adventures in Feministory: Stevie Smith

Author Florence Margaret “Stevie” Smith was born in England in 1902. Though her family called her “Peggy,” Smith’s friends dubbed her “Stevie”... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Lund

AMC’s The Killing, which recently concluded its first season and has been renewed for a second, is as close to Twin Peaks as 21st century television gets. Set in Seattle, homicide detective Sarah Linden investigates the murder of a teenage girl. That’s it - a single murder... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Castle

Castle is a guilty pleasure for me. I once watched four episodes of the show in a night because it’s well-written, witty, and fun—and has some “strong” female characters front and center—so I want to be able to say, just go and watch it right now, don’t even bother reading... Read more »

BiblioBitch: Sisterhood Everlasting

*WARNING: Sisterhood Everlasting begins with a major, surprising event, and I discuss it in this review. Other potential spoilers are marked.* It’s always dicey when an author pushes a series past its logical conclusion. I met each YA sequel to The Sisterhood... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Detectives in Distress

All good characters have a complex back story. But what is it with giving female TV detectives a particularly awful past? By no means is every female investigator on television shown to be “damaged,” but I think there are enough to make up an anecdotal trend. This “damage” is usually crucial in... Read more »

Pages

Know & Tell: The Literary Renaissance of Trans Women Writers

For so long, the people who wrote about us were not us. Finally, that is beginning to change. Read more »

A Look at How Media Writes Women of Color

Nearly every Saturday morning, feminists of color hold Twitter discussions taking a deeper look at issues, such as gender violence. It’s the... Read more »

Eat, Pray, Spend: Priv-Lit and the New, Enlightened American Dream

Even as reports on joblessness, economic recovery, and home foreclosures suggest that no one is immune to risk during this recession, the popularity of women’s wellness media has persisted and, indeed, grown stronger.  Read more »