Books

Loud and Queer: The Problem with Demanding Queer Visibility

We need to find alternative templates for talking about queer representation.

(No) Escape Zone: Two Authors Bring Us to Terms with Our Mortality

The more we’re encouraged to talk to one another about death, the less scary and anxiety-inducing it is. Read more »

Power Lies: Sarah Kendzior on the America That Made Donald Trump Possible

“Anyone could have found the things I found, and could have put them together.” Read more »

Immigration as Inspiration: Who Gets to Be an All-American Girl?

It’s very hard for people who are not immigrants to really understand what it’s like to move to a place where you don’t speak the language and how hard it is to find a home. Read more »

Samantha Irby on “Wow, No Thank You” and Desanitizing Women’s Lives and Bodies

Samantha Irby will make you cringe as hard as you laugh. Read more »

Love the Hard Way: Reflecting on the Magnificence of “The Bluest Eye”

“Ugliness,” one of the novel’s running themes, is examined under an unforgiving spotlight because it’s such a familiar experience for young Black girls. Read more »

Laugh at My Pain: Finding the Humor in Being a “Black Widow”

Grief is a thing that will live, in some way, in our DNA and our body and be triggered by the wrong song or the wrong turn down the street where you see someone that looks like the person you lost. Read more »

Staying Soft: Megan Giddings Explores the Hypervigilance of Black Women in “Lakewood”

The participants—nearly all people of color—break bones and lose teeth to help advance the future of science and healthcare. Read more »

BitchReads: 13 Books Feminists Should Read in March

Reading can be such a relief in such strenuous times. Read more »

Playing for Freedom: Welcome to the Queer Gaming Revolution

The queer games avant-garde is a rising tide of indie games being developed by, about, and often for LGBTQ people. Read more »

Stephanie Wrobel on Writing a Monstrous Mother

We have less sympathy for perpetrators when their illness hurts someone else.  Read more »

Pages

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »

Demanding the Impossible: Walidah Imarisha Talks About Science Fiction and Social Change

Before she was a poet, journalist, documentary filmmaker, anti-prison activist, and college instructor, Walidah Imarisha was fascinated... Read more »

Know & Tell: The literary renaissance of trans women writers

For so long, the people who wrote about us were not us. Finally, that is beginning to change. Read more »