Books

Rethinking Legacy: "Tastemakers" is a Starting Point for the Problematic History of Recipes and Food Media

The James Beard award winner Mayukh Sen’s first book invites trouble, but more questions come up in the process.

BiblioBitch: The Pile of Stuff at the Bottom of the Stairs

Mary is not happy. Simply put, her husband, Joel, is a slob: He leaves garbage, wet towels, and dirty clothes around and ignores her (or, worse, tells her to “... Read more »

B-Sides: A Wild Flag "Romance"

The debut album from WILD FLAG (say it with me in a Bill and Ted “Wyld Stallyns!” shout-y voice) drops this... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Closing the Case

Well, it’s been a great eight weeks guest blogging here at Bitch about detectives and police work, but unfortunately it’s time to close the case. Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Partners and Sidekicks

While the archetypal hard-boiled detective might be a bit of a lone wolf, almost all detectives—especially on-screen detectives—need a partner, a team, or at least a sidekick. Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and Detective Work Outside the System

Despite the dodgy politics of the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo series, Lisbeth Salander is an interesting character from a feminist perspective because she is a rare detective on the outside, with no faith in the system to produce a just result. Read more »

Stage Left: Originals vs. Adaptations

One theme that comes up over and over again in conversations about the State of Musical Theater Today is the tragic lack of original musicals on Broadway. The way everything is an adaptation of an adaptation of an adaptation. No one’s having new and creative ideas anymore! Well, to be blunt,... Read more »

We're All Mad Here: Mental Illness in YA Fiction

Young adult literature features a number of depictions of mentally ill characters, from authors who both bother to do their homework and take the time to present their work well and authors who don’t seem to feel that research and sensitivity are necessary. In YA especially, depictions of... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Young Detectives

One of the reasons the detective genre is so beloved for so many of us, I think, is because we grow up on mysteries and detective stories. Read more »

Pop Pedestal: Ed "Shred" Fargo

I have a lasting affection for Fearless, a young adult series created by Francine Pascal. (Yes, that Francine Pascal.) For today’s addition to Pop Pedestal, a... Read more »

Bibliobitch: A Q&A with the Editors of The Revolution Starts at Home

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities is an incredible anthology (that started as a zine) out from South End Press providing... Read more »

Pages

Eat, Pray, Spend: Priv-Lit and the New, Enlightened American Dream

Even as reports on joblessness, economic recovery, and home foreclosures suggest that no one is immune to risk during this recession, the popularity of women’s wellness media has persisted and, indeed, grown stronger.  Read more »

Hot Under the Bonnet: The Cooptation of Amish Culture in Mass-Market Fiction

Dubbed “Amish romance novels,” “Amish fiction,” or the more waggish “bonnet rippers,” these novels just one entry point into the varying images of Amish communities in U.S. popular culture. Read more »

Black Girls Hunger for Heroes, Too: A Black Feminist Conversation on Fantasy Fiction for Teens

What happens when two great black women fiction writers get together to talk about race in young adult literature? That's exactly what happens... Read more »

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »