Books

Joan Didion Taught Us How To Embrace Complication

The lens we use in storytelling impacts the reality of readers, and Didion was committed to getting it right.

Pop Pedestal: Ed "Shred" Fargo

I have a lasting affection for Fearless, a young adult series created by Francine Pascal. (Yes, that Francine Pascal.) For today’s addition to Pop Pedestal, a... Read more »

Bibliobitch: A Q&A with the Editors of The Revolution Starts at Home

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Intimate Violence Within Activist Communities is an incredible anthology (that started as a zine) out from South End Press providing... Read more »

Sealing the Deal: The wet and wild world of selkie romance novels

In 1972, Kathleen E. Woodiwiss published The Flame and the Flower. With this novel, Woodiwiss transformed the romance genre by making explicit what had previously been implied—that is, sex—and created a formula for success that romance authors would follow for decades. The archetypal... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: The Tourist Detective, Colonial Legacies

Earlier this month, Christian Science Monitor published a list of “Top 7 Detective Series Set in Foreign Locales,” a selection which is meant to “keep you on the edge of your beach chair,” as they put it. Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Reality Calling

Since this series is about detective narratives in pop culture, this post was originally going to be about CSI. But at time of writing (Tuesday afternoon) everyone in our office in London came home early because of fears of another night of riots and looting, and so it’s just too... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: The Thin Man

The Thin Man gave us one of the wittiest crime-solving wife-husband duos of all time, retired detective Nick Charles and his wife Nora (Myrna Loy*), who spit one-liners, soak up a tremendous amount of alcohol and stumble around solving crime. Read more »

Bitch YA Book Club: A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

For our final YA book club, Nona Willis Aronowitz asks Erin Blakemore and Jennie Law what they thought about A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. Add your own answers to Nona’s questions (or come up with your own discussion points) in... Read more »

Murder, She Blogged: Surfing Mystery Writers and the Cop-Criminal Buddy Relationship

From Agatha Christie’s forgotten sporting accomplishments to male bonding between criminals and cops. Read more »

Sexual Inadequacy: Ambiguously Gay Wizards

I’ve noticed a trend in the content attributed to and depicting the three male Harry Potter leads—Rupert Grint, Tom Felton, and Daniel Radcliffe—and the running joke that they might secretly be gay for one another. This idea isn’t original to them, of course. The male leads of... Read more »

Pages

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »

Know & Tell: The Literary Renaissance of Trans Women Writers

For so long, the people who wrote about us were not us. Finally, that is beginning to change. Read more »

Hot Under the Bonnet: The Cooptation of Amish Culture in Mass-Market Fiction

Dubbed “Amish romance novels,” “Amish fiction,” or the more waggish “bonnet rippers,” these novels just one entry point into the varying images of Amish communities in U.S. popular culture. Read more »

A Look at How Media Writes Women of Color

Nearly every Saturday morning, feminists of color hold Twitter discussions taking a deeper look at issues, such as gender violence. It’s the... Read more »