Books

Female Trouble: Why Daphne Du Maurier’s “Rebecca” Still Possesses our Imaginations

What makes Daphne du Maurier’s prose feel fresh and unique to this day is just how real it is in capturing the way women observe.

Adventures in Feministory: Maya Angelou

Through Maya Angelou’s grief, she started writing what would become perhaps the most famous series of autobiographies published in English; a series without precedent and which seems impossible to follow. Read more »

Iconography: Jean Rhys and Jane Eyre

It's time to head back to the nineteenth century, and one Miss Charlotte Brontë. Jane Eyre (1847) is, of course, one of the most widely-read books in the English language. But I wonder about the kinds of readings that are to be had here. And I wonder what I'm getting out of this book that... Read more »

Iconography: It

Discuss the women of crime, that is. Crime fiction is still seen as very much a gentleman's genre, something at which fans of Agatha Christie and Patricia Highsmith, for a start, scoff vigorously (if scoffing can be performed vigorously). It isn't all Arthur Conan Doyle or hardboiled detectives... Read more »

B-Sides: Jay-Z's Lyrics, "Decoded"

Jay-Z is arguably the most successful hip-hop artist in the world. He owns a sports team, created a... Read more »

Iconography: Chloe Wofford, Toni Morrison, and Turning the Erased into the Iconic

Born Chloe Anthony Wofford in 1931, Toni Morrison is one of the most iconic literary figures of the twentieth century. She was born in Ohio, to which her parents, Ramah Willis Wofford and George Wofford, moved in order to escape the racist climate of the US South. I'll be referring to her by the... Read more »

Iconography: Tamora Pierce and All the Feminist Fantasy Heroines You Could Want

Tamora Pierce is every feminist fantasy fan's favorite, hands down. She writes engaging adventure stories with, for a nice chance, substantive engagement with social justice issues. Born in Pennsylvania in 1954, Pierce started writing her fierce teenage... Read more »

Iconography: Harry Potter and the Girls Who Weren

The series may be barely over, but we all knew from about the fourth book on that Harry Potter is the children's literary icon of its time. Let's take a look at its author, J.K. Rowling, and the young ladies of the series. Read more »

Iconography: Picturing What the Kids are Reading These Days

Gather around, children. It's time for a story. Several, actually. I've been thinking about picture books, and how big an impact a story can have with just a few words. Get thinking about the picture book icons of your childhood while I take you through some of my experiences and what the kids are... Read more »

Adventures in Feministory: Djuna Barnes

Djuna Barnes was a poet, novelist, journalist, and artist whose work was known for its unique prose rhythms, its sexual openness, and its fascination with the bawdy and grotesque. She lived in Greenwich Village in the bohemian 1910s, frequented the artists' salons in 1920s Paris, and late in life... Read more »

Iconography: The Rather Extraordinary Astrid Lindgren and Pippi Longstocking

If any icons loom large, they're those of our formative years. Let's open up some children's books, shall we? With sales numbering at about 145 million copies and, according to UNESCO, as the world's twenty-... Read more »

Pages

Demanding the Impossible: Walidah Imarisha Talks About Science Fiction and Social Change

Before she was a poet, journalist, documentary filmmaker, anti-prison activist, and college instructor, Walidah Imarisha was fascinated... Read more »

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »

Eat, Pray, Spend: Priv-Lit and the New, Enlightened American Dream

Even as reports on joblessness, economic recovery, and home foreclosures suggest that no one is immune to risk during this recession, the popularity of women’s wellness media has persisted and, indeed, grown stronger.  Read more »