Books

BitchReads: 13 Nonfiction Books Feminists Should Read this September

There is so much to read in so little time, which is one of the myriad reasons I love curating the BitchReads list on a (semi)-regular basis.

Abortion: the "shmashmortion" of 2008?

In a tiny bit of synergy, I read this excellent piece by Katha Pollitt only an hour after sitting at my ob-gyn's office next to a pregnant teen gabbing on a hot-pink cellphone. In other news, all the abortion discussion that was nowhere to be found in 2007's trifecta of unplanned-pregnancy films... Read more »

The Great Cover-Up: Can High Necklines Cure Low Morals?

In an era when it's possible to turn on the television on any given night and see a clutch of bikini-clad women crawling over their male prey (ABC's The Bachelor), a sex-toy demonstration (HBO's Real Sex), or a 9-year-old showing off her moves on her parents' personal stripper pole (E!'s Keeping Up... Read more »

Shelf Lives: Paging Through Feminism’s Lost & Found Classics

In the 1976 cross-country race film The Gumball Rally, the late, great Raul Julia rips off his rearview mirror and tosses it over his shoulder, saying "What's behind me is not important." 
 He didn't win the race. 
 Maybe that's because what's behind us actually is important. Feminist literature... Read more »

Save the Shorts

Perhaps my love for the short story is due to my sometimes short attention span, but if you, too, adore them, you should consider subscribing to One Story. A nonprofit literary magazine, they publish one writer's short story every few weeks. That's it—literally one short story per issue in a stand-... Read more »

Andi Z on the B-word

For the third time this year, the word bitch has made national headines. Read cofounder and editorial director Andi Zeisler's take in the Washington Post. Is it a bad word? Of course it is. As a culture, we've done everything possible to make sure of that, starting with a constantly perpetuated... Read more »

Mini quiches and meerkats in Cambridge

This morning we met up with Amy Hoffman, editor of the Women's Review of Books and author of the soon-to-be-released An Army of Ex-Lovers. We met at Zaftig's, a Jewish deli, where we chatted over oatmeal and borscht about what's happening at the Women's Review and what it's like living in Boston.... Read more »

Pumpkins in Philly

On the subway this morning, I sat next to a man reading, Why Men Marry Bitches. Somewhat comically, the woman sitting on the other side of me was reading Che Guevara's essays on How to Change the World. Lisa and I met again at Penn Station, where we boarded our train to Philadelphia. This city... Read more »

Bitch in Brooklyn

Perched on a Brooklyn patio in still-perfect weather, Lisa and I mapped out our time here. Then it was off to our first fundraising house party, hosted by Jennifer Baumgardner—who's interviewed in our current issue about her new book, Look Both Ways: Bisexual Politics. Apparently, the wording on... Read more »

Desert Hearts: In a New Crop of Romance Novels, It's Always Midnight at the Oasis

The average romance-novel hero hasn't changed much since the genre's development in the late 19th century—he's dashing, arrogant, commanding, hopefully rich, possibly even a prince. But is he an Arab? More and more commonly, the answer is yes. It seems that an Arab man can now get on the cover of a... Read more »

Feminine Protection: An Interview with “Whipping Girl” author Julia Serano

We should focus our energies on challenging the rather arbitrary meanings and values that get placed onto our sexed bodies, gender expressions, and sexualities. Read more »

Pages

Hot Under the Bonnet: The cooptation of Amish culture in mass-market fiction

Dubbed “Amish romance novels,” “Amish fiction,” or the more waggish “bonnet rippers,” these novels just one entry point into the varying images of Amish communities in U.S. popular culture. Read more »

Rewriting the Future: Using Science Fiction to Re-Envision Justice

Our justice movements desperately need science fiction. Read more »

Know & Tell: The literary renaissance of trans women writers

For so long, the people who wrote about us were not us. Finally, that is beginning to change. Read more »