We publish a new feminist podcast episode every week. Our hour-long show Popaganda digs deep on movies, books, TV, and media while Backtalk is a snappy conversation between two Bitch editors about the week’s pop culture. Subscribe to the podcasts on iTunes!
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Popaganda: Faking It

Why do we do fake it, and what does it mean when we accuse others of doing it?

Backtalk: Good, Bad & Problematic at The Oscars

Inclusion riders, yes please! 

Popaganda: Watching What You Eat

What does it take to get “well”? When we think about wellness, especially right now, we tend to think of it as everything we do to make our lives and bodies healthy. Rather than defining health through the negation of sickness, wellness advocates press that being “well” is an ongoing process of maintenance and care. But so much of what we think about wellness is so wrapped up in watching and being watched—through fitness apps, Instagram, bureaucracy, or just the day-to-day experience of going to the grocery store.

Backtalk: Stoneman Douglas & The Olympics

This week, Dahlia and Amy talk about the growing anti-gun student movement that’s happened since the shooting at the Parkland, Florida, high school and an update about the Winter Olympics. After the latest horrific shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas high school, students have rallied together to demand serious gun control and that the NRA get out of the pockets of politicians. And at this year’s Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, a #MeToo moment with Shaun White and some incredible performances from Chloe Kim and the American figure skating team. Plus, a Petty Political Pminute and a new Amy vs. Dahlia poll!   

Popaganda: You Feel Me?

Popaganda is back! In this episode, we’re going to be talking about an emotion you’ve probably heard a lot about lately: empathy. The way we talk about it, it’s almost like a superpower: it’s like we want to believe that the cure to political divisiveness, racism, and even war lies in the act of imagining exactly how someone else feels. But is empathy really going to save the world?  

Backtalk: Actual Bad Feminists

This week, Dahlia and Amy (a.k.a your friendly neighborhood rage cheerleaders) talk about Rose McGowan’s confrontation with trans activist Andi Dier and Katie Roiphe’s “feminist” screed against #MeToo. At a recent stop on her book tour, Dier asked McGowan to explain remarks she made on Rupaul’s podcast about how transwomen didn’t grow up as women. Then they talk about the Roiphe essay you don’t need to read and how exhausting contrarian feminists need to step away from writing unproductive fodder criticizing young women.

Backtalk: #MeToo Backlash & Larry Nassar Sentencing

This week, Dahlia and Amy dig into the latest “feminist” backlash against the #MeToo movement in light of Babe.Net’s Aziz Ansari—a story which showed how a celebrity who banked on his male feminist allyship ultimately doesn’t want to respect boundaries around consent. Then they talk about the sentencing hearing for former USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University physician Larry Nassar, who has pled guilty to child molestation, and the systemic failure of powerful organizations to protect the vulnerable. Plus, another Petty Political Pminute on Trump’s terrible tweet about this year’s Women’s March and the latest in the Mueller investigation. 

Backtalk: Is It Really Time’s Up in Hollywood?

In this first episode of 2018, Dahlia and Amy get into this year’s Golden Globes, the Time’s Up movement, and the misguided obsession for Oprah 2020. The Golden Globes is the first awards show since the fallout from the Weinstein effect and it didn’t shy away from talking about #MeToo and the latest movement to announce that Time’s Up for sexual harassment and violence against women in the industry. But is it all for show and what will real, concrete change look like? Plus, they kick off another segment of Petty Political Pminute with all the best/worst details from Michael Wolff’s tell-all of the first days of the Trump White House in Fire and Fury.

Backtalk: We Made It Through 2017

The year that felt like a decade with the inauguration of 45, no gun reform in sight, attacks on marginalized communities through policies, the normalization of supremacists, and, of course, the Weinstein effect. But we made it through because we have one another and we believe in the possibility of real concrete change. On this episode, Dahlia and Amy share their pop culture faves that got them through this year from Latinx pop music and the TV series based on Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale and Alias Grace to the November elections and pro-athletes taking a stand by taking a knee. We have hope, power in numbers, and we’re ready for 2018 for more inspiring pop culture and for invites to impeachment parties. Don’t let the bastards grind you down.

Backtalk: Silence Breakers & The Weinstein Effect

This week, Dahlia and Amy break down Time’s much-anticipated “Person of the Year” magazine cover and cover story, and the continued fallout from the Weinstein effect. We thank our respective dieties that Trump’s ego isn’t being fed for being on the Time cover, but another white supremacist icon graces its cover instead. Taylor Swift accompanies Ashley Judd, agricultural worker Isabel Pascual, former Uber engineer Susan Fowler, lobbyist Adama Iwu, and an anonymous hospital worker who represents those who are unable to speak out publicly. Though Swift had her own sexual harassment suit to contend with, we dig into whether or not she’s really a “silence breaker.” Then they discuss the latest batch of folks of predators and why Woody Allen is still a protected Hollywood institution (like, wyd, Kate Winslet?). 

Popaganda: Fembots

From Metropolis to Westworld, female robots have always played out complicated power dynamics onscreen. While the term “fembots” conjurs up the image of killer mechanical sex-kittens from Austin Powers, cinematic stories about female robots often deal with much darker and deeper dynamics. In this episode, filmmaker and professor Allison de Fren walks us through the history of female robots onscreen in movies like The Stepford Wives, Ex Machina, and Her and how their stories revolve around issues of power and control. Then, for you Westworld obsessives, poet and scholar Margaret Rhee discusses the race and gender dynamics of hit HBO series Westworld. But, of course, robots are all around us in real life, too. Feminist researcher Miriam Sweeney delves into the world of virtual assistants that have female voices and bodies, from the modern Siri to the old-school Ms. Dewey.