Podcasts

We publish a new feminist podcast episode every week. Our hour-long show Popaganda digs deep on movies, books, TV, and media while Backtalk is a snappy conversation between two Bitch editors about the week’s pop culture. Subscribe to the podcasts on iTunes!
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Bitch Popaganda: Cultural Twinkies Edition

Welcome back to another episode of Bitch Popaganda! Tune in as Andi, Kjerstin, and Kelsey discuss Anna Holmes’ Washington Post column “Donald Trump’s Sexism,” eating your cultural vegetables (watching things you don’t actually enjoy), and what we’re looking forward to this summer at the movies. Links and more after the jump!

B-Sides: Sex, Hope, Alison Mosshart, Ellen Willis, and Rock'n'Roll

“Rock is, among other things, a potent means of expressing the active emotions—anger, aggression, lust, the joy of physical exertion—that feed all freedom movements, and it is no accident that women musicians have been denied access to this powerful musical language. I think it’s crucially important for female performers to break that barrier and force rock to reflect their experience and aspirations.” - Ellen Willis It’s no secret that I’m a rather huge fan of Alison Mosshart. But on the train home after being simply blown away by the Kills at Terminal 5 Friday night, I started trying to pick apart just why.

Bitch Popaganda: Fantastic Voyage Edition

It’s time for another episode of Bitch Popaganda! Tune in as Julie, Brian, and Kelsey discuss HBO’s new George R.R. Martin series Game of Thrones and “Funny Like a Guy: Anna Faris and Hollywood’s woman problem,” a profile by Tad Friend in this week’s New Yorker.

B-Sides: RYAT Girl (and Guy)

Christina Ryat has been making electronic music as RYAT since 2006 (fans of Electo Feminisms take note!). She recently teamed up with Tim Conley and their debut album Avant Gold came out last month from Obvious Bandits.

Bitch Popaganda: It Should Be A Crime Edition

In this episode of Popaganda, Kjerstin, Deb, and Julie chat about AMC’s new series The Killing, Slate’s confusing article on gerontophilia, and the revelation that the Candies’ Foundation spent seven times the amount on Bristol Palin that it did on preventing teen pregnancy.

B-Sides: "What the Hell" Do You Make of This?

Perhaps inspired by her recent divorce from Sum 41’s Deryck Whibley, “What the Hell” describes kissing various people and blowing off societal expectations. Now, the song’s not without its problems. There’s the “crazy” issue, and the lyrics are addressed to an unhappy main squeeze, which begs the question of how consensual their non-monogamy really is. Still, as with the Lou Christie classic “Lightnin’ Strikes,” I hear it as an exploration of dating around rather than a glorification of infidelity. “What the Hell” gave me the same flutter as Cher’s 1998 smash “Believe,” which burst onto the radio between songs about miserable devotion with the revelation “Maybe I’m too good for you.” Yes, Avril’s latest got my stamp of approval. But then I saw the video. Official music video and commentary after the jump!

Bitch Popaganda: Womance Edition

It’s time for another episode of Bitch Popaganda! This week we’re coming at you live (OK, taped) from Austin, Texas! Tune in as Sara Reihani, Erica Lies, and Kelsey Wallace discuss women in comedy.

Bitch Popaganda: Get Your Hands (and Your Video Camera, and Your Ring) Off Me Edition

It’s time for another episode of Bitch Popaganda! Tune in as Kjerstin, Julie, and Kelsey discuss right-wing video stings, the death of traditional marriage, and hugs: what’s up with them?

B-Sides: Abigail Washburn

Sometimes part of what makes a musician so compelling is the story behind them. Were the White Stripes married, or brother and sister? Would Sid have been the character he was without Nancy? Is the girl in the “Cry Me a River” video REALLY supposed to be Britney Spears? (I have strong feelings about this one because I was young and impressionable when Britters and Justin dated and broke up. But that’s another post entirely.) The same is true of Abigail Washburn. Her music is outstanding on its own, but the road she took to fame is too serendipitous not to share.

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