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Backtalk: YA's Cancel Culture

This week, Dahlia and Amy dig into the world of YA drama. Recently, two YA authors have chosen to cancel their own debut novels after being called out by some readers for “problematic” issues in the text. Dahlia and Amy talk about the effects of a cancel culture that demands perfect art. Also, a Petty Political Pminute on what may be the road ahead to 45’s impeachment. And Amy vs. Dahlia is debating the worst of the worst: manspreading vs mansplaning! What’s your choice? Text “Man” to 503-855-6485 to let us know what you think!

Shelf Love: How A.N. Devers Created a Feminist Paradise for Bibliophiles

In London’s bustling Soho neighborhood, A.N. Devers’s feminist paradise for bibliophiles is thriving—and changing the way collectors think about the literary canon. Read more »

Platonic Ideal: In "My Brilliant Friend," Companionship and Survival are Forever Linked

Safety in any manifestation is a luxury for Elena and Lila, as is liberty. Read more »

BitchWatch: The Most Anticipated Movies of 2019

It’s a new year with a lot of goodies in store for us onscreen. Read more »

Andrea Gibson’s “Lord of the Butterflies” Celebrates Constant Transformation

In their fifth collection of poetry, Lord of the Butterflies, Andrea Gibson resists tidy narratives in favor of dramatizing a life that’s vibrant with constant transformation. Read more »

Bitch in a Box: Creepy Holidays

These picks will satisfy everyone on your list who is more “strange and unusual” than “holly and jolly.” Read more »

20th Century Boy: In the 1930s, the Word “Transsexual” Didn't Exist in the English Language. So Laura Dillon Had to Label Herself.

No literature at all existed to guide those female-bodied people who wished to become men. Read more »

Dear Lane: “How To Be Alone” is Vulnerable, Funny, and Profoundly Healing

How To Be Alone gave me closure for trauma. Read more »

Turning Fury Into Fuel: Three Women Authors on Publishing’s New Investment in Anger

Infiltrating the toxic architecture, learning and exposing its mechanics, cutting the wires, and burning it all down is my type of Trojan Horse chess play—being strategic and precise, turning fury into fortitude. Read more »

Political Revisioning: How Men Police Women’s Anger in Writing Workshops

Our bodies and the way we are visibly coded determines if our anger can be “justified” in the eyes of the viewer. Read more »

Et Tu, Brutes: Donna Zuckerberg on How Misogyny Red-Pilled the Classics

When the Red Pillers—online communities of far-right, anti-feminist men—need to back up their misogynist and racist claims, they look to Ovid, Euripides, or the Stoics. Read more »

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