Literature

Type of genre for books

Andrea Gibson’s “Lord of the Butterflies” Celebrates Constant Transformation

In their fifth collection of poetry, Lord of the Butterflies, Andrea Gibson resists tidy narratives in favor of dramatizing a life that’s vibrant with constant transformation.

Bitch in a Box: Creepy Holidays

These picks will satisfy everyone on your list who is more “strange and unusual” than “holly and jolly.” Read more »

20th Century Boy: In the 1930s, the Word “Transsexual” Didn't Exist in the English Language. So Laura Dillon Had to Label Herself.

No literature at all existed to guide those female-bodied people who wished to become men. Read more »

Dear Lane: “How To Be Alone” is Vulnerable, Funny, and Profoundly Healing

How To Be Alone gave me closure for trauma. Read more »

Turning Fury Into Fuel: Three Women Authors on Publishing’s New Investment in Anger

Infiltrating the toxic architecture, learning and exposing its mechanics, cutting the wires, and burning it all down is my type of Trojan Horse chess play—being strategic and precise, turning fury into fortitude. Read more »

Political Revisioning: How Men Police Women’s Anger in Writing Workshops

Our bodies and the way we are visibly coded determines if our anger can be “justified” in the eyes of the viewer. Read more »

Et Tu, Brutes: Donna Zuckerberg on How Misogyny Red-Pilled the Classics

When the Red Pillers—online communities of far-right, anti-feminist men—need to back up their misogynist and racist claims, they look to Ovid, Euripides, or the Stoics. Read more »

2018 Was the Summer of the Asian Beach Read

Having access to the “beach read” label feels like acceptance—the ability to reach audiences who might see our work as a source of pleasure instead of education. Read more »

Girl on a Sexist Bandwagon: The Consequences of Publishing’s “Gone Girl” Craze

In these books, certain women are allowed to be messy, make mistakes, and commit heinous crimes while also being presented as anti-heroines who are simply ensnared in systems larger than themselves. Read more »

Backtalk: Don’t Waste Hannah Gadsby’s Time

This week, Dahlia and Amy dig into Hannah Gadsby’s tremendous, heartbreaking, and honest Nanette. Gadsby’s Netflix special gives us insight into what it means to to tell one’s story to wide acceptance—at one’s own expense. Using comedy as an example, Gadsby asks: Is it enough to be in... Read more »

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