On Our Radar: Feminist News Roundup

Happy Tuesday, folks! Here’s what we tuned into this morning.

• Roxane Gay highlights the importance of giving 35 women space to tell their deeply personal accounts of being sexually assaulted by Bill Cosby in this week’s New York magazine. [The Toast]

• I love this refreshing short article about some lesser-known beautiful African women in the history of Western art. [MsAfropolitan]

• First Look published a report that says the Department of Homeland Security has been monitoring Black Lives Matter protests since Ferguson. [First Look/Intercept]

• In the wake of Sandra Bland’s death, Stacey Brown tells about her ordeal in raising her young Black daughter as free spirited. [Washington Post]

• Here’s an investigative piece that sheds light on the reality of America’s H-2 visa program that invites foreign workers to work legally but leaves thousands of workers deprived of fair pay, abused, and at risk of assault. [Buzzfeed]

• Also, it’s worth revisiting a TED talk by Noy Thrupkaew who talks about the pervasive veins of human trafficking in the world and more particularly in the United States. [Ted]

• This piece takes us back to a resonating 1978 Black feminist text Michele Wallace’s Black Macho and the Myth of the Superwoman, which shines light on black patriarchy and how it affects black women in the present day. [Vice]

• Check out this fabulous essay by Jess Zimmerman on the “cultural baggage” of mid-life-crisis and how she owns it like a woman. [Hazlitt]

• The Stanford Prison Experiment comes out this month—the movie is based on the famous Stanford experiment that explored the psychology behind how prisons work and substantiates that being in a hostile situation can “overwhelm our natural dispositions toward kindness and compassion.” [Medium]

Tell us what you are reading in the comments section below!


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by Manmeet Sahni
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Originally from India, Manmeet is a writer currently based in Quito, Ecuador.  When not staring at the light-emitting devices, she can be found reading, exploring unknown turfs. You can find her on Twitter

 

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