Screen

Blood Sport: The Most Feminist Part of “IT Chapter Two” Is a Staple in Horror

There’s one genre that has never shied away from depicting menstruation: horror. Read more »

Ashes to Ashes, Outer space to Oceans: Who Gets to Have an Alternative Death in America?

Many of the faces of “alternative death” are white, and there’s much less engagement with the cultural, community, and social traditions of communities of diverse color and faith in America. Read more »

A Quick History of TV’s Elusive Quest for Complex Black Lesbians

Characters are being given more complexity onscreen, as they are offered the chance to explore their queerness in ways typically reserved for white queer women. Read more »

“Four Weddings” Is Still a Pop Culture Starting Point for Sign Language

It helps not to think of a signed language, a written language, and a spoken one as being in any way connected to each other at all, but to recognize them as distinct, each one a living, breathing entity. Read more »

In Hot Water: “The Kitchen” Is a Comic-Book Adaptation Whose Diversity Feels Forced

The film pushes a shallow image of female unity, flattening the complex characters from the comic into easily readable types. Read more »

Hot Mic: Priyanka Chopra’s Selectively Woke Stardom Is a Strategic—and Risky—Decision

Diasporas and communities of color often feel that we must pedestalize even the least bit of representation that comes our way. Read more »

Not A Stereotype: 5 TV Shows That Depict Mental Health Surprisingly Well

TV is slowly making progress and learning how to tell the stories of characters with mental health conditions. Read more »

Drama, Not Trauma: Rape Culture, “Veronica Mars,” and the Spectacle of Sexual Violence

From the very beginning, sexual assault is simply fodder for drama in the world of Neptune, California. Read more »

In Favor of Straight White Viewers, “Queer Eye” Lives in the Middle Ground

Many straight women love and enjoy Queer Eye. Does it hold the same weight with queer women? Read more »

In “The Nightingale,” Rape is a Tool of Colonialism

The horror depicted in The Nightingale is that of colonial violence’s endlessness, a war for power designed to go on forever. Read more »

Pages

What I Learned About Gender and Power from Sailor Moon

My life began in 1995 — the year I turned eight and became a divorced kid.    Read more »

Films and TV Portray Abortion as More Dangerous Than It Is

Films and television shows tend to present a skewed portrayal of abortion—when fictional movies and TV shows include a plotline about abortion... Read more »

The Dramatic History of American Sex-Ed Films

In 1948, in a seventh grade classroom in Eugene, Oregon, a teacher dimmed the lights and flipped on 16mm projector. A film called Human... Read more »

One-Sentence Reviews of the Lesbian Netflix Canon

Lez face it: when you’re a ladygay like myself, cruising the internet for something to watch, you realize very quickly that there are a whole... Read more »