Culture

Joan Didion Taught Us How To Embrace Complication

The lens we use in storytelling impacts the reality of readers, and Didion was committed to getting it right.

What We Lose When Music Divas Become Movie Stars

 When pop stars turn to film, they’re at the whims of mostly male directors who squander their visionary talent. Read more »

The Secret Abortion Movement That Revolutionized Feminist Health Before “Roe v. Wade”

“We traveled everywhere, and everywhere there were women who wanted to learn this.” Read more »

Headhunters: Are Psychedelics Capitalism's New Productivity Hack?

What underlies the use and abuse of performance-enhancing drugs is an American obsession with self-improvement that will always find new targets and tools. And most recently, “plasticity”—another term for cognitive flexibility or the brain’s ability to adapt and change—has become a signifier of... Read more »

Policing Parents: Jessamine Chan’s “The School for Good Mothers” Imagines a Carceral State for “Bad” Moms

In Jessamine Chan’s debut novel, “The School for Good Mothers,” the question of how to punish bad mothers is answered by the state, in an America not much different from our own. Read more »

“Yellowjackets” and the Disturbing Reality of Social Contract

With Yellowjackets, the so-called “puzzle-box show” achieves a kind of maturity by doing away with the conspiratorially furrowed brow of the masculine heroes who are obsessed with, and eventually resolve, whatever metaphysical conundrum that has made life unlivable. Read more »

Our 10 Most-Read Stories of 2021

From the misogynoir Meghan Markle faced to people being weird about Elliot Page’s body, these were our most-read stories from 2021. Read more »

Her Prerogative: Britney Spears Can Do Whatever the Hell She Wants

Fans’ calls to #UnfreeBritney were a sharp contrast to the rallying cries that flooded social media and the streets outside Spears’ conservatorship hearings. Read more »

Rethinking Legacy: "Tastemakers" is a Starting Point for the Problematic History of Recipes and Food Media

The James Beard award winner Mayukh Sen’s first book invites trouble, but more questions come up in the process. Read more »

The Audacity of Confidence: Is It Imposter Syndrome or Is It Patriarchy?

At least 70 percent of people are estimated to experience this profound sense of phrenic inadequacy at some point in their lives, resulting in anxiety, lack of self-confidence, depression, frustration, and more. Read more »

Whitewashed History: The “Loud” Podcast Amplifies Reggaeton’s Overlooked Black Roots

Ivy Queen’s insightful podcast “Loud” examines reggaeton’s past, present, and future. Read more »

Pages

A Look at How Media Writes Women of Color

Nearly every Saturday morning, feminists of color hold Twitter discussions taking a deeper look at issues, such as gender violence. It’s the... Read more »

Eat, Pray, Spend: Priv-Lit and the New, Enlightened American Dream

Even as reports on joblessness, economic recovery, and home foreclosures suggest that no one is immune to risk during this recession, the popularity of women’s wellness media has persisted and, indeed, grown stronger.  Read more »

No Disrespect: Black Women and the Burden of Respectability

Hollywood still filters (and distorts) the lives and histories of minorities through the eyes of the majority. Read more »

Dear Bear: My Partner Makes No Money. Is That a Problem?

Our advice columnist offers a lesson in anticapitalist self-care. Read more »