fiction

Amanda Leduc and Fantasy Authors Challenge the Trope of “Broken” Disabled People

Fairy tales and their contemporary counterparts—superhero tales, science fiction, fantasy—shape our collective ideas about what it means to be powerful and beautiful. 

BitchReads: 27 Novels Feminists Should Read in 2020

We’ve already published our most-anticipated lists of nonfiction and young-adult books, but this one, featuring 27 adult novels, is special. Read more »

The Best Queer YA Novels of 2019

It’s been a stunning year for queer young-adult novels. Read more »

A Queerer World: 2019 Is the Year of the LGBTQ YA Novel

This year, LGBTQ young adult novels have finally diversified the queer experience. Read more »

Piece of Cake: Helen Oyeyemi’s "Gingerbread" Is a Delightful Feast

Helen Oyeyemi’s new novel, Gingerbread, takes on the deeper question behind Hansel and Gretel’s story. Read more »

Girl on a Sexist Bandwagon: The Consequences of Publishing’s “Gone Girl” Craze

In these books, certain women are allowed to be messy, make mistakes, and commit heinous crimes while also being presented as anti-heroines who are simply ensnared in systems larger than themselves. Read more »

4 Books to Read for Women’s History Month

From the modern American South, to 19th-century Ghana, to a spaceship en route to Mars, these stories capture compelling visions of the lives of women of color. Read more »

Wild Enchantment: The Creatureliness of Barbara Comyns

Sometimes I come across novelists whose work is alive with wildness. Barbara Comyns is one of these. Read more »

BitchReads: 7 Books You Must Read in November

Pair these books with cider.  Read more »

“Meanwhile, Elsewhere” Unapologetically Centers Trans People In Sci-Fi

A banal world is in the realm of fantasy for trans people. Read more »

“Sing, Unburied, Sing” Explores the Ghastly History of Mass Incarceration

Jesmyn Ward has written one of the best books of 2017.  Read more »

Pages

Hot Under the Bonnet: The Cooptation of Amish Culture in Mass-Market Fiction

Dubbed “Amish romance novels,” “Amish fiction,” or the more waggish “bonnet rippers,” these novels just one entry point into the varying images of Amish communities in U.S. popular culture. Read more »