film

Unpoetic Injustice: “Queen & Slim” Treats Its Outlaws as Misguided Political Symbols

It treats its strangers–turned–outlaws as political symbols rather than fleshed-out characters with interests and flaws.

In 2019, “Charlie’s Angels” Isn’t Just about Girl Power—It’s a Critique of Male Leadership

In 2019, Charlie’s Angels is less about impossibly perfect women saving the world. Read more »

Fighting to Thrive: Reflecting on “Boys Don’t Cry” 20 Years Later

Representation matters, but so do the stories that the media—film and television—chooses to tell about trans lives. Read more »

The Final (Male) Frontier: “Lucy in the Sky” and “Proxima” Bring Women Astronauts down to Earth

The final frontier continues to be a male-dominated arena, fertile ground for storytelling that taps into masculine psychologies in symbolically grandiose fashion. Read more »

99 Percent Savior: In Contemporary Horror, It’s the Final Girl versus the Rich

The Final Girl is no longer a babysitter or camp counselor, but a working-class outsider to wealth and decadence who is treated as an exploitable object to be lured in with money. Read more »

Finite Love: What Lesbian Period Dramas Lose When We Project Our Fears on Them

Films and television series featuring queer characters are still relatively scarce. Read more »

30 Years Later, “Kiki’s Delivery Service” Is Still Inspiring Young Feminists

Kiki’s Delivery Service offers a safe space that makes you feel connected to others, but most importantly a community of powerful women. Read more »

Hell Is Older People: Aging as the Ultimate Cinematic Horror

Unlike horror-movie fates such as, say, decapitation by paper cutter, aging is the ultimate fright because viewers recognize that they cannot escape it. Read more »

Uneasy Spirits: Black Vengeance in Supernatural Pop Culture

There’s a specter in our midst, and it’s white people’s projection of their own guilt and fear onto the Black search for justice. Read more »

Girl Watchers: The Uneasy Female Gaze of “Black Conflux” and “The Other Lamb”

Two new films challenge sexist coming-of-age tales where teen girls are master manipulators. Read more »

Transmitting Culture: A New Slate of Films Serve as Love Letters to Korean American Mothers

Always Be My Maybe, Searching, and To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before depict Asian American mothers as worthy of the same care, sympathy, and compassion that they bestow on their children, family, and friends. Read more »

Pages

One-Sentence Reviews of the Lesbian Netflix Canon

Lez face it: when you’re a ladygay like myself, cruising the internet for something to watch, you realize very quickly that there are a whole... Read more »

Films and TV Portray Abortion as More Dangerous Than It Is

Films and television shows tend to present a skewed portrayal of abortion—when fictional movies and TV shows include a plotline about abortion... Read more »

Black Girls Hunger for Heroes, Too: A Black Feminist Conversation on Fantasy Fiction for Teens

What happens when two great black women fiction writers get together to talk about race in young adult literature? That's exactly what happens... Read more »

The Dramatic History of American Sex-Ed Films

In 1948, in a seventh grade classroom in Eugene, Oregon, a teacher dimmed the lights and flipped on 16mm projector. A film called Human... Read more »