The Love Below: 15 Black Romance Movies You Can Watch This Month

What the Obamas have built in real life is available to other Black people through cinema.

For the Love of Independence: Romance Authors Are Literature’s Unsung Heroines

Women working for themselves while changing the culture of romance is explicitly feminist. Read more »

Revolution In Romance: Jasmine Guillory Gives Black Women the Book We’ve Been Waiting For

Jasmine Guillory might be the author who revitalizes romance novels. Read more »

I Want You, But I'm Triggered: Finding Pleasure When Trauma and Memory Collide

Triggers happen. Here’s what to do when trauma threatens to disrupt your pleasure. Read more »

First Base is the Home Run: Kissing as the Ultimate Pleasure

The importance of being wet and getting wet can’t really be overstated. Read more »

Being a Second Lover Means Loving Yourself First

With a lot of honesty, being a second lover can come with freedom, discovery, and lessons in self-love. Read more »

Small Change: Queer Feminist Characters Deserve “Happily Ever After” Romance Novels

I wanted the romance genre to have space for a character like Ginger. Read more »

The Pleasure Dome: On Nonmonogamy and Casual Sex

With time, I’ve learned that under the layers of socialization—and jealousy—there’s deeper wiring that says yes to one, or yes to two, or yes to many. Read more »

Teenage Fever: “Everything, Everything” Subverts the Whiteness of Teen Romance Movies

Everything, Everything proves that teen romance movies don’t have to revolve around whiteness. Read more »

Be a Man: The Disruption of Toxic Masculinity in “Master of None”

Master of None models what healthy platonic relationships should look like for men. Read more »

The Pleasure Dome: Conversations with My Sex Toys

On intimacy, honesty, and queerness: A conversation between our pleasure columnist adrienne maree brown and sex toys. Read more »


Hot Under the Bonnet: The cooptation of Amish culture in mass-market fiction

Dubbed “Amish romance novels,” “Amish fiction,” or the more waggish “bonnet rippers,” these novels just one entry point into the varying images of Amish communities in U.S. popular culture. Read more »